Overview

This lesson uses the Create PT Survival Guide as the backbone for a series of activities to ramp up to doing the actual Create PT. It contains activities to help you understand the algorithm and abstraction requirements of the task, as well as activities to help you narrow down and brainstorm ideas for your actual project.

The lesson concludes by providing you with resources to make a plan to complete the task starting in the next lesson.

Goals

Students will be able to:

Purpose

Although this lesson does not introduce any new content, it serves as a review of the processes and requirements of the Create Performance Task before students begin working on it individually.

Resources

Getting Started

Prompt: Based on the review of the Create PT in the last lesson:

Discuss: Let students call out the things they remember. Make this a quick review just to remind them of what was covered in the previous lesson.

A few of the things you need to do:

What should you do first?

Activity

Introduce The Create PT Survival Guide

Today you will use the Create PT Survival Guide to dig in a little deeper with the Create PT. The beginning of the packet has a number of quick activities that help get you in the right mindset for thinking about, and doing, the task, so you are ready to hit the ground running. The guide is intended to be useful throughout the entire process of completing the actual Create Task, as well.

Distribute: The Create PT Survival Guide and have students Read page 1 to get an overview of the task.

Is It a Good Algorithm? (page 2)

Prompt: The Create PT requires you to write and describe an algorithm in your program. Based on what we learned yesterday looking at scored samples, and the criteria listed here, what are the characteristics of that algorithm?

To get our brains moving we're going to look at some submissions for the algorithms and discuss whether they're good choices.

Activity: Does it Count? - Algorithm Edition (pages 2 - 4)

Prompt: Using what you just discussed about your algorithm choices and the scoring guideline provided, determine for each algorithm whether it would get the point and why. Discuss your choices with a partner.

Pro Tip: Focus on the following points from the Survival Guide:

Is It a Good Abstraction? (page 5)

Prompt: The Create PT requires you to write and describe an abstraction in your program. Based on what we learned yesterday looking at scored samples, and the criteria listed here, what are the characteristics of that algorithm?

To get our brains moving we're going to look at some submissions for the abstraction and discuss whether they're good choices.

Activity: Does It Count? - Abstraction Edition

Prompt: Using what you just discussed about your abstraction choices and the scoring guideline provided, determine for each abstraction whether it would get the point, why, and whether you can determine whether it manages complexity.

Give students individually 5-10 minutes to look at the list of abstraction selections and write down their judgements about whether it should earn the point, why, and if it manages complexity.

Pro Tip: Focus on the following points from the Survival Guide:

Pro Tip: Both Activty 2 and 3 work to help you understand that in looking at the code, an AP reader is looking for very specific things - it's a checklist. Familiarity with that checklist helps when planning your own project.

Pro Tip: Don't worry or focus too much in the gray areas of some of the examples - they are intentionally borderline to show where the border is. Try to be safely over that border.

Narrow it Down (page 8)

Prompt: Read the Narrow it Down section, and be prepared to discuss your major takeaways, and any questions you have.

Discuss: Have students share their thoughts. The most important points to note:

With a partner go through these three example project proposals. For each one, practice narrowing down the features of the project, and identifying the core algorithm.

Pro Tip: Major take-aways from Narrow It Down:

Bring It All Together (page 10)

Prompt: Read the Bring It All Together section, be ready to discuss how you plan to go about selecting a project.

Discuss: Have students share their thoughts. The most important points to note:

Brainstorm Project Ideas

Come up with two example project ideas. List some simple information about each project so that a partner can give you some feedback on your idea. When deciding on a project the answer to these questions should all be "yes":

Wrap Up

Make Your Plan (pages 11-12)

Pages 11 and 12 are there to help you plan and manage your time. You will be allowed to check in with your plan as you work, so you can stay on track. If there are parts that are hard to fill in, these are the areas you should focus on.

Pro Tip: Final reminders and suggestions:

Standards Alignment